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Wipro’s Li-Fi solution could slake the thirst of bandwidth-devouring Indians

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Wi-Fi 6 is here and it’s great
No individual device on your wireless network may run that much faster, but your total speed will increase.

Imagine your entire family of digital addicts nestled in their various cocoons, watching movies at 1,000-times the speed you are accustomed to now, seamlessly and without interference. At this speed, everyone is able to stream 30 movies at the same time in 1080 HD. Needless to say, quite possibly for the first time in your life, you are a superhero.

This is the reality that Wipro and a Scottish company called Purelifi is bringing to your home. Wipro may be famous because of its IT arm, but it also has a large and well-reputed lighting division and an FMCG wing. (Azim Premji, former chariman of Wipro — he just handed over the reins to his son — used to sell vegetable oil before he transformed his company into an IT giant.)

Purelifi has successfully run a pilot project at Kyle Academy secondary school in Ayr, Scotland as part of Scotland’s digital strategy mapping. Other pilots have taken place at mobile phone company O2 and the Devonport Dockyard in Plymouth in conjunction with the Royal Navy. In fact, Prof. Harald Haas, founder and chief scientist of Purelifi, and also a professor of mobile communications at Edinburgh University coined the word Li-Fi so it’s a good bet that they know their onions.

Suddenly, in a bandwidth choked world, Li-Fi’s data dense technology can be tantalising. Its one pre-requisite — light — is everywhere. Li-Fi uses infra-red, ultra-violet as well as visible light to send data zooming about flawlessly whereas Wi-Fi is dependent on radio frequencies to piggyback on which can be prone to corruption and signal interference. Purelifi’s solution uses an Ethernet cable attached to a router and then connected to an access point, which in turn is wired to a Wi-Fi-enabled LED light.

LED lights are basically semiconductors so by adjusting brightness levels at speeds invisible to the human eye, Li-Fi can ramp up download speeds up to a scorching 1078Mbps. You plug a dongle with a transmitter and receiver into your laptop or tablet and presto, you’re in business. The dongle sends and receives data from and to the light.

Li-Fi isn’t perfect. Its signals can’t permeate walls. Its range is ultra short — 10 metres or less. And it needs light, although Purelifi says it can function when a room appears to be dark at 60 lux. Yet these concerns are mere trifles when you consider the incredible potential that Li-Fi brings when daisy-chaining a series of lights to its technology, especially in a place like India where a humongous number of users are yet to come online and where network speeds and interruptions are chronic headaches.

Purelifi’s solution has always been to stress Li-Fi’s supporting role — not competitive — in alleviating bandwidth problems. You still need some kind of pipe to get your connection to you — but from there on it is lightning fast and eminently dependable, eliminating the familiar network congestions. Its potential in the educational and medical fields, which rely on tons of videos or data heavy scans, can be immense.

But there’s also a more pivotal role for Li-Fi. Its data dense nature makes it highly capable of aiding the new digital era and specific areas of it such as augmented reality, virtual reality, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Smart cities can use it to power a whole host of machines from just its street lamps.

Li-Fi could also save your life. Since it doesn’t leak radio signals or have interference issues, it can be used in practically any kind of environment from hospitals to nuclear plants to aircraft making it the fastest, most reliable way to access information.

Still we will never know the possibilities or potential unless Wipro makes this an affordable and well-marketed solutions package, so the jury is still out on its transformative powers.

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The Best Features Of The Aston Martin Vulcan

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Although the Vulcan was specifically designed not to be road legal, one owner decided that they wanted to stick on some license plates and take it on the highway anyway. Except, it was far from that simple, as the conversion process required making some major changes to the car, and cost several hundred thousand dollars on top of the original purchase price (via Motor1). The street conversion was handled by RML Group but had full support from the Aston Martin factory, and after completion, it became the only road-legal Vulcan in existence.

Among the litany of changes required were the addition of windshield wipers, side mirrors, and a central locking system. Michelin road tires were also fitted, and a new set of headlights had to be installed to meet height requirements for British roads. The bladed tail lights were also covered over for safety, and a few of the sharper surface edges around the cabin were smoothed out. Then, the engine was remapped to meet emissions requirements, the suspension was softened, and a lift system was installed to give the car extra clearance for speed bumps. After all that, plus a few final touches, a license plate was fitted and the car was ready to go. Unfortunately, it seems like the owner’s enthusiasm for taking it on the road quickly evaporated, as checking the car’s plates against the British government database shows that its MOT (the annual national roadworthiness test) certificate expired back in January 2022.

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5 Cars Owned By Bob Seger That Prove He Has Great Taste

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Pulling into the final spot on the list is a 1969 Shelby Cobra GT350 Fastback. This particular car is unique for a few reasons. First, it was the last “new original” Shelby that Ford would produce. The GT350 and GT500 released in 1970 weren’t actually new or original but re-VIN’d production cars from the previous year. Also, during the summer of ’69, Carrol Shelby ended his association with Ford (via MustangSpecs).

It had one of Ford’s new 351 Windsor V8 engines with a 470 CFM four-barrel Autolite carburetor under the hood that pounded out 290hp and 385 lb-ft of torque. Its 0 – 60 time was a modest 6.5 seconds, and it did the quarter mile in 14.9 seconds (via MustangSpecs).

According to MustangSpecs, it was typically mated to a 4-speed manual transmission, but Seger’s had a Tremec 6-speed stick instead (via Mecum Auctions). Seger’s Candy Apple Red GT350 had Ford’s upgraded interior package, flaunting a landscape of imitation teak wood covering the dash, steering wheel, door accents, and center console trim (via MustangSpecs).

According to Mecum Auctions, Seger’s was number 42 of 935. When it sold at auction in 2013 for $65,000, it noted that it had been displayed at the Henry Ford Museum at the Rock Stars, Cars & Guitars Exhibit.

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Here’s What Made Volkswagen’s Air-Cooled Engine So Special

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Engines like the Chevy Small Block, Ford 5.0, Chrysler HEMI, and Toyota 2JZ are known for power, torque, and how quickly they can propel a hunk of steel down the drag strip or around the corners of a track. The Volkswagen air-cooled engine is remembered amongst people who have owned one as reliable, easy to maintain, and as numerous as grains of sand on the beach. VW made literally tens of millions of the engine, including over 21 million in just the Beetle (via Autoweek). 

It’s difficult to nail down specific aspects of the engine’s early history as sources tend to disagree on years. But the engine can be traced back to very early Volkswagen models designed with help from Ferdinand Porsche and built in the late-1930s to early 1940s in Nazi Germany. Official sources from Volkswagen are reluctant to acknowledge use of the engine or even the existence of the Beetle prior to the end of World War II.

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