Connect with us

Mobile

Zuckerberg wants messages to auto-expire to make Facebook a ‘living room’ – TechCrunch

Published

on

6 mins ago
Mobile

1 Views

On feed-based “broader social networks, where people can accumulate friends or followers until the services feel more public . . . it feels more like a town square than a more intimate space like a living room” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a blog post today. With messaging, groups, and ephemeral stories as the fastest growing social features, Zuckerberg laid out why he’s rethinking Facebook as a private living room where people can be comfortable being themselves without fear of hackers, government spying, and embarrassment from old content — all without encryption allowing bad actors to hide their crimes.

Perhaps this will just be more lip service in a time of PR crisis for Facebook. But with the business imperative fueled by social networking’s shift away from permanent feed broadcasting, Facebook can espouse the philosophy of privacy while in reality servicing its shareholders and bottom line. It’s this alignment that actually spurs product change. We saw Facebook’s agility with last year’s realization that a misinformation- and hate-plagued platform wouldn’t survive long-term so it had to triple its security and moderation staff. And in 2017, recognizing the threat of Stories, it implemented them across its apps. Now Facebook might finally see the dollar signs within privacy.

The New York Times’ Mike Isaac recently reported that Facebook planned to unify its Facebook, WhatsApp, and Instagram messaging infrastructure to allow cross-app messaging and end-to-end encryption. And Zuckerberg discussed this and the value of ephemerality on the recent earnings call. But now Zuckerberg has roadmapped a clearer slate of changes and policies to turn Facebook into a living room:

-Facebook will let users opt in to the ability to send or receive messages across Facebook, WhatsApp, and Instagram

-Facebook wants to expand that interoperability to SMS on Android

-Zuckerberg wants to make ephemerality automatic on messaging threads, so chats disappear by default after a month or year, with users able to control that or put timers on individual messages.

-Facebook plans to limit how long it retains metadata on messages once it’s no longer needed for spam or safety protections

-Facebook will extend end-to-end encryption across its messaging apps but use metadata and other non-content signals to weed out criminals using privacy to hide their misdeeds.

-Facebook won’t store data in countries with a bad track record of privacy abuse such as Russia, even if that means having to shut down or postpone operations in a country

You can read the full blog post from Zuckerberg below:

A Privacy-Focused Vision for Social Networking

My focus for the last couple of years has been understanding and addressing the biggest challenges facing Facebook. This means taking positions on important issues concerning the future of the internet. In this note, I’ll outline our vision and principles around building a privacy-focused messaging and social networking platform. There’s a lot to do here, and we’re committed to working openly and consulting with experts across society as we develop this.

Over the last 15 years, Facebook and Instagram have helped people connect with friends, communities, and interests in the digital equivalent of a town square. But people increasingly also want to connect privately in the digital equivalent of the living room. As I think about the future of the internet, I believe a privacy-focused communications platform will become even more important than today’s open platforms. Privacy gives people the freedom to be themselves and connect more naturally, which is why we build social networks.

Today we already see that private messaging, ephemeral stories, and small groups are by far the fastest growing areas of online communication. There are a number of reasons for this. Many people prefer the intimacy of communicating one-on-one or with just a few friends. People are more cautious of having a permanent record of what they’ve shared. And we all expect to be able to do things like payments privately and securely.

Public social networks will continue to be very important in people’s lives — for connecting with everyone you know, discovering new people, ideas and content, and giving people a voice more broadly. People find these valuable every day, and there are still a lot of useful services to build on top of them. But now, with all the ways people also want to interact privately, there’s also an opportunity to build a simpler platform that’s focused on privacy first.

I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services, and we’ve historically focused on tools for more open sharing. But we’ve repeatedly shown that we can evolve to build the services that people really want, including in private messaging and stories.

I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won’t stick around forever. This is the future I hope we will help bring about.

We plan to build this the way we’ve developed WhatsApp: focus on the most fundamental and private use case — messaging — make it as secure as possible, and then build more ways for people to interact on top of that, including calls, video chats, groups, stories, businesses, payments, commerce, and ultimately a platform for many other kinds of private services.

This privacy-focused platform will be built around several principles:

Private interactions. People should have simple, intimate places where they have clear control over who can communicate with them and confidence that no one else can access what they share.

Encryption. People’s private communications should be secure. End-to-end encryption prevents anyone — including us — from seeing what people share on our services.

Permanence. People should be comfortable being themselves, and should not have to worry about what they share coming back to hurt them later. So we won’t keep messages or stories around for longer than necessary to deliver the service or longer than people want it.

Safety. People should expect that we will do everything we can to keep them safe on our services within the limits of what’s possible in an encrypted service.

Interoperability. People should be able to use any of our apps to reach their friends, and they should be able to communicate across networks easily and securely.

Secure data storage. People should expect that we won’t store sensitive data in countries with weak records on human rights like privacy and freedom of expression in order to protect data from being improperly accessed.

Over the next few years, we plan to rebuild more of our services around these ideas. The decisions we’ll face along the way will mean taking positions on important issues concerning the future of the internet. We understand there are a lot of tradeoffs to get right, and we’re committed to consulting with experts and discussing the best way forward. This will take some time, but we’re not going to develop this major change in our direction behind closed doors. We’re going to do this as openly and collaboratively as we can because many of these issues affect different parts of society.

Private Interactions as a Foundation

For a service to feel private, there must never be any doubt about who you are communicating with. We’ve worked hard to build privacy into all our products, including those for public sharing. But one great property of messaging services is that even as your contacts list grows, your individual threads and groups remain private. As your friends evolve over time, messaging services evolve gracefully and remain intimate.

This is different from broader social networks, where people can accumulate friends or followers until the services feel more public. This is well-suited to many important uses — telling all your friends about something, using your voice on important topics, finding communities of people with similar interests, following creators and media, buying and selling things, organizing fundraisers, growing businesses, or many other things that benefit from having everyone you know in one place. Still, when you see all these experiences together, it feels more like a town square than a more intimate space like a living room.

There is an opportunity to build a platform that focuses on all of the ways people want to interact privately. This sense of privacy and intimacy is not just about technical features — it is designed deeply into the feel of the service overall. In WhatsApp, for example, our team is obsessed with creating an intimate environment in every aspect of the product. Even where we’ve built features that allow for broader sharing, it’s still a less public experience. When the team built groups, they put in a size limit to make sure every interaction felt private. When we shipped stories on WhatsApp, we limited public content because we worried it might erode the feeling of privacy to see lots of public content — even if it didn’t actually change who you’re sharing with.

In a few years, I expect future versions of Messenger and WhatsApp to become the main ways people communicate on the Facebook network. We’re focused on making both of these apps faster, simpler, more private and more secure, including with end-to-end encryption. We then plan to add more ways to interact privately with your friends, groups, and businesses. If this evolution is successful, interacting with your friends and family across the Facebook network will become a fundamentally more private experience.

Encryption and Safety

People expect their private communications to be secure and to only be seen by the people they’ve sent them to — not hackers, criminals, over-reaching governments, or even the people operating the services they’re using.

There is a growing awareness that the more entities that have access to your data, the more vulnerabilities there are for someone to misuse it or for a cyber attack to expose it. There is also a growing concern among some that technology may be centralizing power in the hands of governments and companies like ours. And some people worry that our services could access their messages and use them for advertising or in other ways they don’t expect.

End-to-end encryption is an important tool in developing a privacy-focused social network. Encryption is decentralizing — it limits services like ours from seeing the content flowing through them and makes it much harder for anyone else to access your information. This is why encryption is an increasingly important part of our online lives, from banking to healthcare services. It’s also why we built end-to-end encryption into WhatsApp after we acquired it.

In the last year, I’ve spoken with dissidents who’ve told me encryption is the reason they are free, or even alive. Governments often make unlawful demands for data, and while we push back and fight these requests in court, there’s always a risk we’ll lose a case — and if the information isn’t encrypted we’d either have to turn over the data or risk our employees being arrested if we failed to comply. This may seem extreme, but we’ve had a case where one of our employees was actually jailed for not providing access to someone’s private information even though we couldn’t access it since it was encrypted.

At the same time, there are real safety concerns to address before we can implement end-to-end encryption across all of our messaging services. Encryption is a powerful tool for privacy, but that includes the privacy of people doing bad things. When billions of people use a service to connect, some of them are going to misuse it for truly terrible things like child exploitation, terrorism, and extortion. We have a responsibility to work with law enforcement and to help prevent these wherever we can. We are working to improve our ability to identify and stop bad actors across our apps by detecting patterns of activity or through other means, even when we can’t see the content of the messages, and we will continue to invest in this work. But we face an inherent tradeoff because we will never find all of the potential harm we do today when our security systems can see the messages themselves.

Finding the right ways to protect both privacy and safety is something societies have historically grappled with. There are still many open questions here and we’ll consult with safety experts, law enforcement and governments on the best ways to implement safety measures. We’ll also need to work together with other platforms to make sure that as an industry we get this right. The more we can create a common approach, the better.

On balance, I believe working towards implementing end-to-end encryption for all private communications is the right thing to do. Messages and calls are some of the most sensitive private conversations people have, and in a world of increasing cyber security threats and heavy-handed government intervention in many countries, people want us to take the extra step to secure their most private data. That seems right to me, as long as we take the time to build the appropriate safety systems that stop bad actors as much as we possibly can within the limits of an encrypted service. We’ve started working on these safety systems building on the work we’ve done in WhatsApp, and we’ll discuss them with experts through 2019 and beyond before fully implementing end-to-end encryption. As we learn more from those experts, we’ll finalize how to roll out these systems.

Reducing Permanence

We increasingly believe it’s important to keep information around for shorter periods of time. People want to know that what they share won’t come back to hurt them later, and reducing the length of time their information is stored and accessible will help.

One challenge in building social tools is the “permanence problem”. As we build up large collections of messages and photos over time, they can become a liability as well as an asset. For example, many people who have been on Facebook for a long time have photos from when they were younger that could be embarrassing. But people also really love keeping a record of their lives. And if all posts on Facebook and Instagram disappeared, people would lose access to a lot of valuable knowledge and experiences others have shared.

I believe there’s an opportunity to set a new standard for private communication platforms — where content automatically expires or is archived over time. Stories already expire after 24 hours unless you archive them, and that gives people the comfort to share more naturally. This philosophy could be extended to all private content.

For example, messages could be deleted after a month or a year by default. This would reduce the risk of your messages resurfacing and embarrassing you later. Of course you’d have the ability to change the timeframe or turn off auto-deletion for your threads if you wanted. And we could also provide an option for you to set individual messages to expire after a few seconds or minutes if you wanted.

It also makes sense to limit the amount of time we store messaging metadata. We use this data to run our spam and safety systems, but we don’t always need to keep it around for a long time. An important part of the solution is to collect less personal data in the first place, which is the way WhatsApp was built from the outset.

Interoperability

People want to be able to choose which service they use to communicate with people. However, today if you want to message people on Facebook you have to use Messenger, on Instagram you have to use Direct, and on WhatsApp you have to use WhatsApp. We want to give people a choice so they can reach their friends across these networks from whichever app they prefer.

We plan to start by making it possible for you to send messages to your contacts using any of our services, and then to extend that interoperability to SMS too. Of course, this would be opt-in and you will be able to keep your accounts separate if you’d like.

There are privacy and security advantages to interoperability. For example, many people use Messenger on Android to send and receive SMS texts. Those texts can’t be end-to-end encrypted because the SMS protocol is not encrypted. With the ability to message across our services, however, you’d be able to send an encrypted message to someone’s phone number in WhatsApp from Messenger.

This could also improve convenience in many experiences where people use Facebook or Instagram as their social network and WhatsApp as their preferred messaging service. For example, lots of people selling items on Marketplace list their phone number so people can message them about buying it. That’s not ideal, because you’re giving strangers your phone number. With interoperability, you’d be able to use WhatsApp to receive messages sent to your Facebook account without sharing your phone number — and the buyer wouldn’t have to worry about whether you prefer to be messaged on one network or the other.

You can imagine many simple experiences — a person discovers a business on Instagram and easily transitions to their preferred messaging app for secure payments and customer support; another person wants to catch up with a friend and can send them a message that goes to their preferred app without having to think about where that person prefers to be reached; or you simply post a story from your day across both Facebook and Instagram and can get all the replies from your friends in one place.

You can already send and receive SMS texts through Messenger on Android today, and we’d like to extend this further in the future, perhaps including the new telecom RCS standard. However, there are several issues we’ll need to work through before this will be possible. First, Apple doesn’t allow apps to interoperate with SMS on their devices, so we’d only be able to do this on Android. Second, we’d need to make sure interoperability doesn’t compromise the expectation of encryption that people already have using WhatsApp. Finally, it would create safety and spam vulnerabilities in an encrypted system to let people send messages from unknown apps where our safety and security systems couldn’t see the patterns of activity.

These are significant challenges and there are many questions here that require further consultation and discussion. But if we can implement this, we can give people more choice to use their preferred service to securely reach the people they want.

Secure Data Storage

People want to know their data is stored securely in places they trust. Looking at the future of the internet and privacy, I believe one of the most important decisions we’ll make is where we’ll build data centers and store people’s sensitive data.

There’s an important difference between providing a service in a country and storing people’s data there. As we build our infrastructure around the world, we’ve chosen not to build data centers in countries that have a track record of violating human rights like privacy or freedom of expression. If we build data centers and store sensitive data in these countries, rather than just caching non-sensitive data, it could make it easier for those governments to take people’s information.

Upholding this principle may mean that our services will get blocked in some countries, or that we won’t be able to enter others anytime soon. That’s a tradeoff we’re willing to make. We do not believe storing people’s data in some countries is a secure enough foundation to build such important internet infrastructure on.

Of course, the best way to protect the most sensitive data is not to store it at all, which is why WhatsApp doesn’t store any encryption keys and we plan to do the same with our other services going forward.

But storing data in more countries also establishes a precedent that emboldens other governments to seek greater access to their citizen’s data and therefore weakens privacy and security protections for people around the world. I think it’s important for the future of the internet and privacy that our industry continues to hold firm against storing people’s data in places where it won’t be secure.

Next Steps

Over the next year and beyond, there are a lot more details and trade-offs to work through related to each of these principles. A lot of this work is in the early stages, and we are committed to consulting with experts, advocates, industry partners, and governments — including law enforcement and regulators — around the world to get these decisions right.

At the same time, working through these principles is only the first step in building out a privacy-focused social platform. Beyond that, significant thought needs to go into all of the services we build on top of that foundation — from how people do payments and financial transactions, to the role of businesses and advertising, to how we can offer a platform for other private services.

But these initial questions are critical to get right. If we do this well, we can create platforms for private sharing that could be even more important to people than the platforms we’ve already built to help people share and connect more openly.

Doing this means taking positions on some of the most important issues facing the future of the internet. As a society, we have an opportunity to set out where we stand, to decide how we value private communications, and who gets to decide how long and where data should be stored.

I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it and won’t all stick around forever. If we can help move the world in this direction, I will be proud of the difference we’ve made.

n

n

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday, March 6, 2019

n

n

n

A Privacy-Focused Vision for Social Networking

n

My focus for the last couple of years has been understanding and addressing the biggest challenges facing Facebook. This means taking positions on important issues concerning the future of the internet. In this note, I’ll outline our vision and principles around building a privacy-focused messaging and social networking platform. There’s a lot to do here, and we’re committed to working openly and consulting with experts across society as we develop this.

n

n

Over the last 15 years, Facebook and Instagram have helped people connect with friends, communities, and interests in the digital equivalent of a town square. But people increasingly also want to connect privately in the digital equivalent of the living room. As I think about the future of the internet, I believe a privacy-focused communications platform will become even more important than today’s open platforms. Privacy gives people the freedom to be themselves and connect more naturally, which is why we build social networks.

n

Today we already see that private messaging, ephemeral stories, and small groups are by far the fastest growing areas of online communication. There are a number of reasons for this. Many people prefer the intimacy of communicating one-on-one or with just a few friends. People are more cautious of having a permanent record of what they’ve shared. And we all expect to be able to do things like payments privately and securely.

n

Public social networks will continue to be very important in people’s lives — for connecting with everyone you know, discovering new people, ideas and content, and giving people a voice more broadly. People find these valuable every day, and there are still a lot of useful services to build on top of them. But now, with all the ways people also want to interact privately, there’s also an opportunity to build a simpler platform that’s focused on privacy first.

n

I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services, and we’ve historically focused on tools for more open sharing. But we’ve repeatedly shown that we can evolve to build the services that people really want, including in private messaging and stories.

n

I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won’t stick around forever. This is the future I hope we will help bring about.

n

We plan to build this the way we’ve developed WhatsApp: focus on the most fundamental and private use case — messaging — make it as secure as possible, and then build more ways for people to interact on top of that, including calls, video chats, groups, stories, businesses, payments, commerce, and ultimately a platform for many other kinds of private services.

n

This privacy-focused platform will be built around several principles:

n

Private interactions. People should have simple, intimate places where they have clear control over who can communicate with them and confidence that no one else can access what they share.

n

Encryption. People’s private communications should be secure. End-to-end encryption prevents anyone — including us — from seeing what people share on our services.

n

Permanence. People should be comfortable being themselves, and should not have to worry about what they share coming back to hurt them later. So we won’t keep messages or stories around for longer than necessary to deliver the service or longer than people want it.

n

Safety. People should expect that we will do everything we can to keep them safe on our services within the limits of what’s possible in an encrypted service.

n

Interoperability. People should be able to use any of our apps to reach their friends, and they should be able to communicate across networks easily and securely.

n

Secure data storage. People should expect that we won’t store sensitive data in countries with weak records on human rights like privacy and freedom of expression in order to protect data from being improperly accessed.

n

Over the next few years, we plan to rebuild more of our services around these ideas. The decisions we’ll face along the way will mean taking positions on important issues concerning the future of the internet. We understand there are a lot of tradeoffs to get right, and we’re committed to consulting with experts and discussing the best way forward. This will take some time, but we’re not going to develop this major change in our direction behind closed doors. We’re going to do this as openly and collaboratively as we can because many of these issues affect different parts of society.

n

Private Interactions as a Foundation

n

For a service to feel private, there must never be any doubt about who you are communicating with. Weu2019ve worked hard to build privacy into all our products, including those for public sharing. But one great property of messaging services is that even as your contacts list grows, your individual threads and groups remain private. As your friends evolve over time, messaging services evolve gracefully and remain intimate.

n

This is different from broader social networks, where people can accumulate friends or followers until the services feel more public. This is well-suited to many important uses — telling all your friends about something, using your voice on important topics, finding communities of people with similar interests, following creators and media, buying and selling things, organizing fundraisers, growing businesses, or many other things that benefit from having everyone you know in one place. Still, when you see all these experiences together, it feels more like a town square than a more intimate space like a living room.

n

There is an opportunity to build a platform that focuses on all of the ways people want to interact privately. This sense of privacy and intimacy is not just about technical features — it is designed deeply into the feel of the service overall. In WhatsApp, for example, our team is obsessed with creating an intimate environment in every aspect of the product. Even where we’ve built features that allow for broader sharing, it’s still a less public experience. When the team built groups, they put in a size limit to make sure every interaction felt private. When we shipped stories on WhatsApp, we limited public content because we worried it might erode the feeling of privacy to see lots of public content — even if it didn’t actually change who you’re sharing with.

n

In a few years, I expect future versions of Messenger and WhatsApp to become the main ways people communicate on the Facebook network. We’re focused on making both of these apps faster, simpler, more private and more secure, including with end-to-end encryption. We then plan to add more ways to interact privately with your friends, groups, and businesses. If this evolution is successful, interacting with your friends and family across the Facebook network will become a fundamentally more private experience.

n

Encryption and Safety

n

People expect their private communications to be secure and to only be seen by the people they’ve sent them to — not hackers, criminals, over-reaching governments, or even the people operating the services they’re using.

n

There is a growing awareness that the more entities that have access to your data, the more vulnerabilities there are for someone to misuse it or for a cyber attack to expose it. There is also a growing concern among some that technology may be centralizing power in the hands of governments and companies like ours. And some people worry that our services could access their messages and use them for advertising or in other ways they don’t expect.

n

End-to-end encryption is an important tool in developing a privacy-focused social network. Encryption is decentralizing — it limits services like ours from seeing the content flowing through them and makes it much harder for anyone else to access your information. This is why encryption is an increasingly important part of our online lives, from banking to healthcare services. It’s also why we built end-to-end encryption into WhatsApp after we acquired it.

n

In the last year, I’ve spoken with dissidents who’ve told me encryption is the reason they are free, or even alive. Governments often make unlawful demands for data, and while we push back and fight these requests in court, there’s always a risk we’ll lose a case — and if the information isn’t encrypted we’d either have to turn over the data or risk our employees being arrested if we failed to comply. This may seem extreme, but we’ve had a case where one of our employees was actually jailed for not providing access to someone’s private information even though we couldn’t access it since it was encrypted.

n

At the same time, there are real safety concerns to address before we can implement end-to-end encryption across all of our messaging services. Encryption is a powerful tool for privacy, but that includes the privacy of people doing bad things. When billions of people use a service to connect, some of them are going to misuse it for truly terrible things like child exploitation, terrorism, and extortion. We have a responsibility to work with law enforcement and to help prevent these wherever we can. We are working to improve our ability to identify and stop bad actors across our apps by detecting patterns of activity or through other means, even when we can’t see the content of the messages, and we will continue to invest in this work. But we face an inherent tradeoff because we will never find all of the potential harm we do today when our security systems can see the messages themselves.

n

Finding the right ways to protect both privacy and safety is something societies have historically grappled with. There are still many open questions here and we’ll consult with safety experts, law enforcement and governments on the best ways to implement safety measures. We’ll also need to work together with other platforms to make sure that as an industry we get this right. The more we can create a common approach, the better.

n

On balance, I believe working towards implementing end-to-end encryption for all private communications is the right thing to do. Messages and calls are some of the most sensitive private conversations people have, and in a world of increasing cyber security threats and heavy-handed government intervention in many countries, people want us to take the extra step to secure their most private data. That seems right to me, as long as we take the time to build the appropriate safety systems that stop bad actors as much as we possibly can within the limits of an encrypted service. We’ve started working on these safety systems building on the work we’ve done in WhatsApp, and we’ll discuss them with experts through 2019 and beyond before fully implementing end-to-end encryption. As we learn more from those experts, we’ll finalize how to roll out these systems.

n

Reducing Permanence

n

We increasingly believe it’s important to keep information around for shorter periods of time. People want to know that what they share won’t come back to hurt them later, and reducing the length of time their information is stored and accessible will help.

n

One challenge in building social tools is the “permanence problem”. As we build up large collections of messages and photos over time, they can become a liability as well as an asset. For example, many people who have been on Facebook for a long time have photos from when they were younger that could be embarrassing. But people also really love keeping a record of their lives. And if all posts on Facebook and Instagram disappeared, people would lose access to a lot of valuable knowledge and experiences others have shared.

n

I believe there’s an opportunity to set a new standard for private communication platforms — where content automatically expires or is archived over time. Stories already expire after 24 hours unless you archive them, and that gives people the comfort to share more naturally. This philosophy could be extended to all private content.

n

For example, messages could be deleted after a month or a year by default. This would reduce the risk of your messages resurfacing and embarrassing you later. Of course you’d have the ability to change the timeframe or turn off auto-deletion for your threads if you wanted. And we could also provide an option for you to set individual messages to expire after a few seconds or minutes if you wanted.

n

It also makes sense to limit the amount of time we store messaging metadata. We use this data to run our spam and safety systems, but we don’t always need to keep it around for a long time. An important part of the solution is to collect less personal data in the first place, which is the way WhatsApp was built from the outset.

n

Interoperability

n

People want to be able to choose which service they use to communicate with people. However, today if you want to message people on Facebook you have to use Messenger, on Instagram you have to use Direct, and on WhatsApp you have to use WhatsApp. We want to give people a choice so they can reach their friends across these networks from whichever app they prefer.

n

We plan to start by making it possible for you to send messages to your contacts using any of our services, and then to extend that interoperability to SMS too. Of course, this would be opt-in and you will be able to keep your accounts separate if you’d like.

n

There are privacy and security advantages to interoperability. For example, many people use Messenger on Android to send and receive SMS texts. Those texts can’t be end-to-end encrypted because the SMS protocol is not encrypted. With the ability to message across our services, however, you’d be able to send an encrypted message to someone’s phone number in WhatsApp from Messenger.

n

This could also improve convenience in many experiences where people use Facebook or Instagram as their social network and WhatsApp as their preferred messaging service. For example, lots of people selling items on Marketplace list their phone number so people can message them about buying it. That’s not ideal, because you’re giving strangers your phone number. With interoperability, you’d be able to use WhatsApp to receive messages sent to your Facebook account without sharing your phone number — and the buyer wouldn’t have to worry about whether you prefer to be messaged on one network or the other.

n

You can imagine many simple experiences — a person discovers a business on Instagram and easily transitions to their preferred messaging app for secure payments and customer support; another person wants to catch up with a friend and can send them a message that goes to their preferred app without having to think about where that person prefers to be reached; or you simply post a story from your day across both Facebook and Instagram and can get all the replies from your friends in one place.

n

You can already send and receive SMS texts through Messenger on Android today, and we’d like to extend this further in the future, perhaps including the new telecom RCS standard. However, there are several issues we’ll need to work through before this will be possible. First, Apple doesn’t allow apps to interoperate with SMS on their devices, so we’d only be able to do this on Android. Second, we’d need to make sure interoperability doesn’t compromise the expectation of encryption that people already have using WhatsApp. Finally, it would create safety and spam vulnerabilities in an encrypted system to let people send messages from unknown apps where our safety and security systems couldn’t see the patterns of activity.

n

These are significant challenges and there are many questions here that require further consultation and discussion. But if we can implement this, we can give people more choice to use their preferred service to securely reach the people they want.

n

Secure Data Storage

n

People want to know their data is stored securely in places they trust. Looking at the future of the internet and privacy, I believe one of the most important decisions we’ll make is where we’ll build data centers and store people’s sensitive data.

n

There’s an important difference between providing a service in a country and storing people’s data there. As we build our infrastructure around the world, we’ve chosen not to build data centers in countries that have a track record of violating human rights like privacy or freedom of expression. If we build data centers and store sensitive data in these countries, rather than just caching non-sensitive data, it could make it easier for those governments to take people’s information.

n

Upholding this principle may mean that our services will get blocked in some countries, or that we won’t be able to enter others anytime soon. That’s a tradeoff we’re willing to make. We do not believe storing people’s data in some countries is a secure enough foundation to build such important internet infrastructure on.

n

Of course, the best way to protect the most sensitive data is not to store it at all, which is why WhatsApp doesn’t store any encryption keys and we plan to do the same with our other services going forward.

n

But storing data in more countries also establishes a precedent that emboldens other governments to seek greater access to their citizen’s data and therefore weakens privacy and security protections for people around the world. I think it’s important for the future of the internet and privacy that our industry continues to hold firm against storing people’s data in places where it won’t be secure.

n

Next Steps

n

Over the next year and beyond, there are a lot more details and trade-offs to work through related to each of these principles. A lot of this work is in the early stages, and we are committed to consulting with experts, advocates, industry partners, and governments — including law enforcement and regulators — around the world to get these decisions right.

n

At the same time, working through these principles is only the first step in building out a privacy-focused social platform. Beyond that, significant thought needs to go into all of the services we build on top of that foundation — from how people do payments and financial transactions, to the role of businesses and advertising, to how we can offer a platform for other private services.

n

But these initial questions are critical to get right. If we do this well, we can create platforms for private sharing that could be even more important to people than the platforms we’ve already built to help people share and connect more openly.

n

Doing this means taking positions on some of the most important issues facing the future of the internet. As a society, we have an opportunity to set out where we stand, to decide how we value private communications, and who gets to decide how long and where data should be stored.

n

I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it and won’t all stick around forever. If we can help move the world in this direction, I will be proud of the difference we’ve made.

n”,”protected”:false},”excerpt”:{“rendered”:”

On feed-based “broader social networks, where people can accumulate friends or followers until the services feel more public . . . it feels more like a town square than a more intimate space like a living room” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a blog post today. With messaging, groups, and ephemeral stories as the […]

n”,”protected”:false},”author”:1603003,”featured_media”:1549512,”comment_status”:”open”,”ping_status”:”closed”,”sticky”:false,”template”:””,”format”:”standard”,”meta”:{“outcome”:””,”status”:””,”crunchbase_tag”:0,”amp_status”:””,”relegenceEntities”:[],”relegenceSubjects”:[],”jetpack_publicize_message”:”Zuckerberg wants messages to auto-expire to make Facebook a “living room” https://tcrn.ch/2VCWIUA by @joshconstine”},”categories”:[449557102,449557028,13217,426637499,3457,17396],”tags”:[6474,446778758,81819,6472307,14332125,1003520,42653521,341024,25699058],”crunchbase_tag”:[],”tc_stories_tax”:[],”tc_event”:[],”jetpack_featured_media_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg”,”jetpack_publicize_connections”:[],”shortlink”:”https://tcrn.ch/2VCWIUA”,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”featured”:false,”subtitle”:””,”fundingRound”:false,”seoTitle”:””,”seoDescription”:””,”premiumContent”:false,”tc_cb_mapping”:[{“slug”:”mark-zuckerberg”,”cb_name”:”Mark Zuckerberg”,”cb_slug”:”mark-zuckerberg-person”,”cb_link”:”https://crunchbase.com/person/mark-zuckerberg”},{“slug”:”facebook”,”cb_name”:”Facebook”,”cb_slug”:”facebook-organization”,”cb_link”:”https://crunchbase.com/organization/facebook”},{“slug”:”instagram”,”cb_name”:”Instagram”,”cb_slug”:”instagram-organization”,”cb_link”:”https://crunchbase.com/organization/instagram”}],”associatedEvent”:null,”event”:null,”authors”:[1603003],”hideFeaturedImage”:false,”relatedArticles”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/types/post”}],”version-history”:[{“count”:9,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907/revisions”}],”predecessor-version”:[{“id”:1792984,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907/revisions/1792984″}],”authors”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users/1603003″}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”count”:4,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=1792907&order=asc&tc_hierarchical=flat”}],”https://techcrunch.com/edit”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=1792907&action=edit”}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users/1603003″}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/media/1549512″}],”wp:attachment”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/media?parent=1792907″}],”wp:term”:[{“taxonomy”:”category”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories?post=1792907″},{“taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags?post=1792907″},{“taxonomy”:”_tc_cb_tag_taxonomy”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/crunchbase_tag?post=1792907″},{“taxonomy”:”tc_stories_tax”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_stories_tax?post=1792907″},{“taxonomy”:”tc_event”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_event?post=1792907″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]},”_embedded”:{“authors”:[{“id”:1603003,”name”:”Josh Constine”,”url”:””,”description”:””,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/author/josh-constine/”,”slug”:”josh-constine”,”avatar_urls”:{“24″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/fd3b857e7f0024396cdbd36c4c102a5d?s=24&d=identicon&r=g”,”48″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/fd3b857e7f0024396cdbd36c4c102a5d?s=48&d=identicon&r=g”,”96″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/fd3b857e7f0024396cdbd36c4c102a5d?s=96&d=identicon&r=g”},”links”:{“homepage”:”http://www.JoshConstine.com”,”facebook”:”http://www.facebook.com/JoshConstine”,”twitter”:”https://twitter.com/joshconstine”,”linkedin”:”https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshconstine/”,”crunchbase”:”https://www.crunchbase.com/person/josh-constine”},”position”:”Editor-At-Large”,”cbDescription”:”

Josh Constine is a technology journalist who specializes in deep analysis of social products. He is currently an Editor-At-Large for TechCrunch and is available for speaking engagements.

nn

Previously, Constine was the Lead Writer of Inside Facebook through its acquisition by WebMediaBrands, covering everything about the social network.

nn

Constine graduated from Stanford University in 2009 with a Master’s degree in Cybersociology, examining the influence of technology on social interaction. He researched the impact of privacy controls on the socialization of children, meme popularity cycles, and what influences the click through rate of links posted to Twitter.

nn

Constine also received a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors from Stanford University in 2007, with a concentration in Social Psychology & Interpersonal Processes.

nn

Josh Constine is an experienced public speaker, and has moderated over 120 on-stage interviews in 15 countries with leaders including Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, whistleblower Edward Snowden (via on-stage video conference), and U.S. Senator Cory Booker. He is available to moderate panels and fireside chats, deliver keynotes, and judge hackathon and pitch competitions.

nn

Constine has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, The Atlantic, BBC World Magazine, Slate, and more, plus has been featured on television on Good Morning, America, The Today Show, China Central Television, and Fox News. Constine is ranked as the #1 most cited tech journalist on prestigious news aggregator Techmeme.

nn

[Disclosures: Josh Constine temporarily advised a college friend’s social location-sharing startup codenamed ‘Signal’ that was based in San Francisco before dissolving in 2015. This advising role was cleared with AOL and TechCrunch’s editors and has concluded. Constine’s fiancu00e9e Andee Gardiner co-founded startup accelerator Founders Embassy. Constine’s cousin Darren Lachtman is the founder of influencer advertising startup Niche that was acquired by Twitter, and he’s since left and founded teen content studio Brat. Constine does not write about Founders Embassy or Brat. Constine has personal acquaintances stemming from college housing circa 2007 with founders at Skybox Imaging (now Terra Bella), Hustle, Snapchat, and Robinhood, but does not maintain close social ties with them nor does that influence his writing. Constine occasionally does paid speaking engagements at conferences, but only those funded by companies he does not cover. Constine owns a small position in Ethereum and Bitcoin cryptocurrencies, does not day-trade, and discloses his positions directly in articles where appropriate. Constine does not do consulting, angel investing, or public stock trading beyond public stock invesments by his parents’ estate that he has no role in managing or advising.]

“,”cbAvatar”:”https://crunchbase-production-res.cloudinary.com/image/upload/v1415412437/xje35licfau9iewxnf44.png”,”twitter”:”joshconstine”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users/1603003″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users”}]}}],”replies”:[[{“id”:655245,”parent”:0,”author”:0,”author_name”:”Mark Brian”,”author_url”:””,”date”:”2019-03-06T12:33:12″,”content”:{“rendered”:”

NetApp INT. pays about $50 every half hour! Work for just a few hrs a day and afford yourself more time for your family and friends. Last Wednesday I purchased lovely, cool Yamaha TRICITY, a three wheel scooter that I needed for so long, from having attained $10143 for the last four weeks. A job this simple, Iu2019ve never had. Sounds unbelievable but you won’t forgive yourself if you donu2019t check it out. Netapp Inc Daily Report
n

n”},”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/2019/03/06/facebook-living-room/#comment-655245″,”type”:”comment”,”author_avatar_urls”:{“24″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/c87aefc746a1dc7af7bee778ba4fbfbb?s=24&d=identicon&r=g”,”48″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/c87aefc746a1dc7af7bee778ba4fbfbb?s=48&d=identicon&r=g”,”96″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/c87aefc746a1dc7af7bee778ba4fbfbb?s=96&d=identicon&r=g”},”techcrunch”:{“avatar”:”https://ct.yimg.com/cy/1768/39361574426_98028a_64sq.jpg”,”company”:”PC”,”title”:”Mr”,”user”:”KOR4CDNMKCZOD5GE73RWP36GUU”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments/655245″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments”}],”up”:[{“embeddable”:true,”post_type”:”post”,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907″}]}},{“id”:655252,”parent”:0,”author”:0,”author_name”:”gerard mcloughlin”,”author_url”:””,”date”:”2019-03-06T13:35:08″,”content”:{“rendered”:”

https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_internet84.htm

n”},”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/2019/03/06/facebook-living-room/#comment-655252″,”type”:”comment”,”author_avatar_urls”:{“24″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/c9197cccd4399790d9f4f59bfc038ece?s=24&d=identicon&r=g”,”48″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/c9197cccd4399790d9f4f59bfc038ece?s=48&d=identicon&r=g”,”96″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/c9197cccd4399790d9f4f59bfc038ece?s=96&d=identicon&r=g”},”techcrunch”:{“avatar”:”https://ct.yimg.com/cy/1768/39361574426_98028a_64sq.jpg”,”company”:”VR”,”title”:”Owner”,”user”:”WLWXIPE2TRYEGYILSUMDNFX6V3″},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments/655252″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments”}],”up”:[{“embeddable”:true,”post_type”:”post”,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907″}]}},{“id”:655258,”parent”:0,”author”:0,”author_name”:”nazi nazia”,”author_url”:””,”date”:”2019-03-06T14:09:42″,”content”:{“rendered”:”

I basically gain roughly $6000-$8000 every month on the internet. It is adequate to comfortably replace my old jobs earnings, specially considering I just work about 20 hour in one week from home.Here’s the best way to start out EXPLORE HERE

n”},”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/2019/03/06/facebook-living-room/#comment-655258″,”type”:”comment”,”author_avatar_urls”:{“24″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/4e6a99ffda4f90085bf85a256f13f7fe?s=24&d=identicon&r=g”,”48″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/4e6a99ffda4f90085bf85a256f13f7fe?s=48&d=identicon&r=g”,”96″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/4e6a99ffda4f90085bf85a256f13f7fe?s=96&d=identicon&r=g”},”techcrunch”:{“avatar”:”https://ct.yimg.com/cy/1768/39361574426_98028a_64sq.jpg”,”company”:”(no company found)”,”title”:”(no title found)”,”user”:”5DNOFCDWGGA4QORJT4NF6Q2FC4″},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments/655258″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments”}],”up”:[{“embeddable”:true,”post_type”:”post”,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907″}]}},{“id”:655268,”parent”:0,”author”:0,”author_name”:”sound of music”,”author_url”:””,”date”:”2019-03-06T14:20:21″,”content”:{“rendered”:”

n”},”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/2019/03/06/facebook-living-room/#comment-655268″,”type”:”comment”,”author_avatar_urls”:{“24″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/4c3743c6b4c4b19f8a4eb51ec80e7585?s=24&d=identicon&r=g”,”48″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/4c3743c6b4c4b19f8a4eb51ec80e7585?s=48&d=identicon&r=g”,”96″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/4c3743c6b4c4b19f8a4eb51ec80e7585?s=96&d=identicon&r=g”},”techcrunch”:{“avatar”:”https://ct.yimg.com/cy/1768/39361574426_98028a_64sq.jpg”,”company”:”(no company found)”,”title”:”(no title found)”,”user”:”YMJJH3WEQPLKIDDXAYV2WTPT5Q”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments/655268″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments”}],”up”:[{“embeddable”:true,”post_type”:”post”,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/1792907″}]}}]],”author”:[{“id”:1603003,”name”:”Josh Constine”,”url”:””,”description”:””,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/author/josh-constine/”,”slug”:”josh-constine”,”avatar_urls”:{“24″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/fd3b857e7f0024396cdbd36c4c102a5d?s=24&d=identicon&r=g”,”48″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/fd3b857e7f0024396cdbd36c4c102a5d?s=48&d=identicon&r=g”,”96″:”https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/fd3b857e7f0024396cdbd36c4c102a5d?s=96&d=identicon&r=g”},”links”:{“homepage”:”http://www.JoshConstine.com”,”facebook”:”http://www.facebook.com/JoshConstine”,”twitter”:”https://twitter.com/joshconstine”,”linkedin”:”https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshconstine/”,”crunchbase”:”https://www.crunchbase.com/person/josh-constine”},”position”:”Editor-At-Large”,”cbDescription”:”

Josh Constine is a technology journalist who specializes in deep analysis of social products. He is currently an Editor-At-Large for TechCrunch and is available for speaking engagements.

nn

Previously, Constine was the Lead Writer of Inside Facebook through its acquisition by WebMediaBrands, covering everything about the social network.

nn

Constine graduated from Stanford University in 2009 with a Master’s degree in Cybersociology, examining the influence of technology on social interaction. He researched the impact of privacy controls on the socialization of children, meme popularity cycles, and what influences the click through rate of links posted to Twitter.

nn

Constine also received a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors from Stanford University in 2007, with a concentration in Social Psychology & Interpersonal Processes.

nn

Josh Constine is an experienced public speaker, and has moderated over 120 on-stage interviews in 15 countries with leaders including Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, whistleblower Edward Snowden (via on-stage video conference), and U.S. Senator Cory Booker. He is available to moderate panels and fireside chats, deliver keynotes, and judge hackathon and pitch competitions.

nn

Constine has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, The Atlantic, BBC World Magazine, Slate, and more, plus has been featured on television on Good Morning, America, The Today Show, China Central Television, and Fox News. Constine is ranked as the #1 most cited tech journalist on prestigious news aggregator Techmeme.

nn

[Disclosures: Josh Constine temporarily advised a college friend’s social location-sharing startup codenamed ‘Signal’ that was based in San Francisco before dissolving in 2015. This advising role was cleared with AOL and TechCrunch’s editors and has concluded. Constine’s fiancu00e9e Andee Gardiner co-founded startup accelerator Founders Embassy. Constine’s cousin Darren Lachtman is the founder of influencer advertising startup Niche that was acquired by Twitter, and he’s since left and founded teen content studio Brat. Constine does not write about Founders Embassy or Brat. Constine has personal acquaintances stemming from college housing circa 2007 with founders at Skybox Imaging (now Terra Bella), Hustle, Snapchat, and Robinhood, but does not maintain close social ties with them nor does that influence his writing. Constine occasionally does paid speaking engagements at conferences, but only those funded by companies he does not cover. Constine owns a small position in Ethereum and Bitcoin cryptocurrencies, does not day-trade, and discloses his positions directly in articles where appropriate. Constine does not do consulting, angel investing, or public stock trading beyond public stock invesments by his parents’ estate that he has no role in managing or advising.]

“,”cbAvatar”:”https://crunchbase-production-res.cloudinary.com/image/upload/v1415412437/xje35licfau9iewxnf44.png”,”twitter”:”joshconstine”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users/1603003″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users”}]}}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“id”:1549512,”date”:”2017-10-01T01:04:55″,”slug”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference”,”type”:”attachment”,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/01/anticipate-the-worst/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference/”,”title”:{“rendered”:”Mark Zuckerberg Trump Russian Interference”},”author”:1603003,”license”:””,”authors”:[1603003],”caption”:{“rendered”:””},”alt_text”:””,”media_type”:”image”,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”media_details”:{“width”:1280,”height”:727,”file”:”2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg”,”sizes”:{“thumbnail”:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=150,85″,”width”:150,”height”:85,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=150″},”medium”:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=300,170″,”width”:300,”height”:170,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=300″},”medium_large”:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=768,436″,”width”:768,”height”:436,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=1024″},”large”:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=680,386″,”width”:680,”height”:386,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=680″},”guest-author-32″:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=32,32″,”width”:32,”height”:32,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=32&h=32&crop=1″},”guest-author-50″:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=50,50″,”width”:50,”height”:50,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=50&h=50&crop=1″},”guest-author-64″:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=64,64″,”width”:64,”height”:64,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=64&h=64&crop=1″},”guest-author-96″:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=96,96″,”width”:96,”height”:96,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=96&h=96&crop=1″},”guest-author-128″:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=128,128″,”width”:128,”height”:128,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=128&h=128&crop=1″},”concierge-thumb”:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?resize=50,28″,”width”:50,”height”:28,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg?w=50″},”full”:{“file”:”mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg”,”width”:1024,”height”:582,”mime_type”:”image/jpeg”,”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg”}},”image_meta”:{“aperture”:”0″,”credit”:””,”camera”:””,”caption”:””,”created_timestamp”:”0″,”copyright”:””,”focal_length”:”0″,”iso”:”0″,”shutter_speed”:”0″,”title”:””,”orientation”:”1″,”keywords”:[]},”filesize”:312212},”source_url”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mark-zuckerberg-trump-russian-interference.jpg”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/media/1549512″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/media”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/types/attachment”}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=1549512″}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/tc/v1/users/1603003″}]}}],”wp:term”:[[{“id”:449557102,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/apps/”,”name”:”Apps”,”slug”:”apps”,”taxonomy”:”category”,”parent”:0,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”submenu_categories”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories/449557102″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/category”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?categories=449557102″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?categories=449557102″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?categories=449557102″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:449557028,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/mobile/”,”name”:”Mobile”,”slug”:”mobile”,”taxonomy”:”category”,”parent”:0,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”submenu_categories”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories/449557028″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/category”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?categories=449557028″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?categories=449557028″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?categories=449557028″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:13217,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/policy/”,”name”:”Policy”,”slug”:”policy”,”taxonomy”:”category”,”parent”:0,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”submenu_categories”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories/13217″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/category”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?categories=13217″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?categories=13217″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?categories=13217″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:426637499,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/privacy/”,”name”:”Privacy”,”slug”:”privacy”,”taxonomy”:”category”,”parent”:0,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”submenu_categories”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories/426637499″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/category”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?categories=426637499″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?categories=426637499″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?categories=426637499″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:3457,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/social/”,”name”:”Social”,”slug”:”social”,”taxonomy”:”category”,”parent”:0,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”submenu_categories”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories/3457″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/category”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?categories=3457″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?categories=3457″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?categories=3457″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:17396,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tc/”,”name”:”TC”,”slug”:”tc”,”taxonomy”:”category”,”parent”:0,”rapidData”:{“pt”:””,”pct”:””},”submenu_categories”:[],”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories/17396″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/categories”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/category”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?categories=17396″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?categories=17396″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?categories=17396″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}}],[{“id”:6474,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/encryption/”,”name”:”encryption”,”slug”:”encryption”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/6474″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=6474″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=6474″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=6474″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=6474″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=6474″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:446778758,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/end-to-end-encryption/”,”name”:”end-to-end encryption”,”slug”:”end-to-end-encryption”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/446778758″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=446778758″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=446778758″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=446778758″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=446778758″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=446778758″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:81819,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/facebook/”,”name”:”Facebook”,”slug”:”facebook”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/81819″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=81819″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=81819″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=81819″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=81819″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=81819″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:6472307,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/facebook-messenger/”,”name”:”facebook messenger”,”slug”:”facebook-messenger”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/6472307″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=6472307″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=6472307″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=6472307″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=6472307″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=6472307″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:14332125,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/facebook-policy/”,”name”:”Facebook Policy”,”slug”:”facebook-policy”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/14332125″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=14332125″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=14332125″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=14332125″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=14332125″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=14332125″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:1003520,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/facebook-privacy/”,”name”:”facebook privacy”,”slug”:”facebook-privacy”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/1003520″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=1003520″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=1003520″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=1003520″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=1003520″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=1003520″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:42653521,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/instagram/”,”name”:”Instagram”,”slug”:”instagram”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/42653521″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=42653521″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=42653521″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=42653521″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=42653521″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=42653521″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:341024,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/mark-zuckerberg/”,”name”:”Mark Zuckerberg”,”slug”:”mark-zuckerberg”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/341024″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=341024″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=341024″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=341024″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=341024″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=341024″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:25699058,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/whatsapp/”,”name”:”WhatsApp”,”slug”:”whatsapp”,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags/25699058″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tags”}],”about”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/taxonomies/post_tag”}],”wp:post_type”:[{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?tags=25699058″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/battlefield-companies?tags=25699058″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc-media-gallery?tags=25699058″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_topic?tags=25699058″},{“href”:”https://techcrunch.com/wp-json/wp/v2/tc_video?tags=25699058″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}}],[],[],[]]}}],”media”:[],”events”:[],”battlefieldEvents”:[],”battlefieldCompanies”:[],”battlefieldPages”:[]},”current_posts”:[1792907],”request”:”/2019/03/06/facebook-living-room/”,”siteURI”:”https://techcrunch.com/”,”totalPages”:”0″,”trending”:[{“id”:”576621827″,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/cybersecurity-101/”,”name”:”nCybersecurity 101″,”type”:”tag”},{“id”:”429989″,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/tag/tesla/”,”name”:”nTesla”,”type”:”tag”},{“id”:”60523764″,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/fundings-exits/”,”name”:”nFundings & Exits”,”type”:”category”},{“id”:”449557111″,”link”:”https://techcrunch.com/asia/”,”name”:”nAsia”,”type”:”category”}],”videoPlayerIds”:{“no-ad-autostart”:”56f58bbbe4b01497527036b2″,”regular”:”56df4e9de4b0c9c31d626c18″,”regular-autostart”:”56faf851e4b0d3dcac2e081a”,”sideview-autostart”:”57e2c53fcc52c7730882bbfe”},”facebookPixelId”:”1447508128842484″,”marketoAccountId”:”270-WRY-762″,”vidibleCompanyId”:”564f313b67b6231408bc51ee”,”recaptchaPublic”:”6LeZyjwUAAAAABqkWH_Ct0efGn0B4pGU6ZLUeUvA”,”googleAnalyticsID”:”UA-991406-1″,”googleAnalyticsDomains”:[“techcrunch.com”],”googleMapsAPIKey”:”AIzaSyCodzMYMBdZIpxThSQqm79ACyheeRXPPE4″,”nps_survey_id”:”386TPSJ”,”nps_bucket_percentage”:”0″,”tinypass”:{“scriptDomain”:”https://dashboard.tinypass.com”,”scriptURL”:”https://cdn.tinypass.com/api/tinypass.min.js”,”apiKey”:”Fy7FpgyUxA”,”apiURL”:”https://api.tinypass.com”},”legacyPages”:{“extra-crunch-membership”:1781464},”apiNonce”:”dd92062092″,”userCan”:{“editPosts”:false,”restNonce”:null},”initialStore”:{“events”:{“eventTypeIDs”:[],”eventPostIds”:[],”featuredEventIDs”:{“event_home”:[]},”featuredPostIDs”:{},”pastEventIDs”:{“default”:[]},”pastFilters”:{},”pastLoading”:false,”upcomingEventIDs”:{“default”:null},”upcomingFilters”:{},”upcomingLoading”:false},”section”:{“allPosts”:[1792907],”contentObject”:null,”currentPage”:1,”expandedPost”:”https://techcrunch.com/2019/03/06/facebook-living-room/”,”expandedIsland”:””,”loading”:false,”component”:”singlePost”}},”extraCrunchMarketingPageURL”:”/subscribe”,”newsletterURL”:”http://link.techcrunch.com/join/134/signup-all-newsletters”};
/* ]]> */

Source link



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Mobile

Period tracking app privacy, Snapchat’s paid subscription, calls for TikTok ban – TechCrunch

Published

on

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the weekly TechCrunch series that recaps the latest in mobile OS news, mobile applications and the overall app economy.

The app industry continues to grow, with a record number of downloads and consumer spending across both the iOS and Google Play stores combined in 2021, according to the latest year-end reports. Global spending across iOS, Google Play and third-party Android app stores in China grew 19% in 2021 to reach $170 billion. Downloads of apps also grew by 5%, reaching 230 billion in 2021, and mobile ad spend grew 23% year over year to reach $295 billion.

Today’s consumers now spend more time in apps than ever before — even topping the time they spend watching TV, in some cases. The average American watches 3.1 hours of TV per day, for example, but in 2021, they spent 4.1 hours on their mobile device. And they’re not even the world’s heaviest mobile users. In markets like Brazil, Indonesia and South Korea, users surpassed five hours per day in mobile apps in 2021.

Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours, either. They can grow to become huge businesses. In 2021, 233 apps and games generated over $100 million in consumer spend, and 13 topped $1 billion in revenue. This was up 20% from 2020, when 193 apps and games topped $100 million in annual consumer spend, and just eight apps topped $1 billion.

This Week in Apps offers a way to keep up with this fast-moving industry in one place, with the latest from the world of apps, including news, updates, startup fundings, mergers and acquisitions, and suggestions about new apps to try, too.

Consumers react to Roe v Wade by deleting period tracking apps

In the week after the controversial Supreme Court ruling on Roe v Wade, consumers began to lock down access to their non-protected health data in period tracking apps. There was enough app switching taking place to influence the App Store charts, in fact, as users moved both to and from leading app Flo, benefitting rivals like Clue and Eve, which saw installs increase by 2,200% and 83%, respectively.

There are differing opinions on how much concern there needs to be over this period tracking data. Some argue that period tracking app data would not be the primary evidence used if there were to be prosecutions over now criminalized abortions — an argument, however valid, essentially serves to chastise consumers for reacting in fear by switching to more private apps or deleting them altogether. The bigger picture here is that this data was never HIPPA protected in the first place. And if consumers are reacting with seemingly outsized concern, maybe it’s because the government’s ruling terrifies them about what the future for this country holds. Maybe it not so crazy to switch back to pen and paper at a time when a rogue court is throwing out half a century of established legal precedent in order to control bodies and invade citizens’ privacy.

In any event, many period tracking app providers have been making promises to secure data or introduce new anonymity features. But in an unfortunate twist, it was a newcomer to the market that became the No. 1 app after the ruling — largely based on promises of end-to-end encryption and not its existing protections. As it turned out, the app — Stardust, as it was known — was sharing users phone numbers with a third-party. And after it rolled out its expected encryption later in the week, Stardust was found to be sending the local encryption key back to its servers. In layman’s terms, that means whatever was encrypted could now be decrypted. Not a good look.

Now the House Democrats are considering legislation that could protect abortion rights and secure data in reproductive apps.

Snapchat thinks its users will pay for perks with Snapchat+

Image Credits: Snapchat

Like many tech companies, Snapchat has been struggling amid the tougher economic conditions and inflation. The company reported a challenging first quarter where it had additionally cited supply chain disruptions, the war in Ukraine, labor shortages and rising interest rates as contributing factors to its miss on both revenue and earnings in the quarter, and only a small uptick in daily active users. The company is also still dealing with the fallout from Apple’s 2021 privacy changes, or ATT (App Tracking Transparency), that impacted its advertising business and revenue.

In the midst of these macroeconomic factors, Snap is trying to navigate new regulations around minor safety, lock down its developer platform, roll out parental controls and remain competitive in a market where much of young people’s time spent in apps is now shifting to TikTok and other lightweight networking apps — or what TechCrunch recently dubbed “homescreen social” apps — like LiveIn, BeReal and others.

This has resulted in a search for alternative business models beyond advertising, it seems. This week, Snap introduced Snapchat+ — a $3.99/month subscription that provides access to premium features like being able to pin a friend as a “BFF,” see who rewatched a Story and the ability to change the app icon. The move, which was leaked in advance, follows the launches of similar subscription options aimed at power users, like Telegram Premium’s recent launch and Twitter Blue. It’s hard to say if these investments will pay off in the long run. For now, Twitter continues to make the majority of its revenue from ads and a small bit from data licensing. Telegram’s offering is too new to analyze at this time.

Snapchat+, meanwhile, is targeting an audience with perhaps even less to spend on subscription services. Will Snap’s high-schooler customers want to use their babysitting money, allowance or income from another minimum wage job or side hustle to gain a few extra features? Were these features actually in high demand, the way Twitter’s Edit button was? What’s the strategy for enhancing the offering over time? How will Snap evaluate which features to add — is it analyzing user data or behavior? Will it launch a feedback forum? Or will it just come up with ideas on its own? What percentage of revenue will Snapchat+ need to target to be considered a success? What are the ramifications to Snap if the product fails? Would Snap consider a bundle that combines hardware (like its new drone camera) and software?

For what it’s worth, Snap clearly didn’t want to invite much scrutiny of this major change to its business model. The company only offered one outlet, The Verge, an interview and said very little in it — beyond conveying to investors that this won’t be a “material new source of revenue.” Snap also tried to suggest to the outlet that it had been thinking about subscriptions for over five years, as if the new product was not reactive to the state of its business today.

Of course, tech companies weigh a variety of ideas all the time! But the timing of when they allocate real-world resources to build them is what actually matters. And Snap built a new way to make money at a time when the old way is suffering.

Oh, we’re thinking about banning TikTok again?

tiktok glitch

Image Credits: TechCrunch

The GOP wants to force you to use Reels. OK, that’s not quite the story — but that could be the result.

In actuality, Brendan Carr, the senior Republican on the Federal Communications Commission, wrote to Apple and Google to insist they pull TikTok from their app stores, calling it “a sophisticated surveillance tool” that’s harvesting “extensive amounts of personal and private data.”

Carr’s letter was prompted by the new report from BuzzFeed News which found that ByteDance staff in China had access to U.S. users’ TikTok data as recently as January 2022. (Beijing-based ByteDance owns TikTok and its Chinese sister app, Douyin).

Carr demanded the companies respond by July 8 if they didn’t comply and why. Specifically, he asked the app stores to explain why they would not penalize an app engaged in “the surreptitious access of private and sensitive U.S. user data by persons located in Beijing” coupled with “TikTok’s pattern of misleading representations and conduct.”

TikTok has long insisted it stores U.S. users’ data in the U.S. itself, with backups in Singapore, and said the data was outside the jurisdiction of China’s national security law which requires companies to turn over data to the Communist party if requested. But if TikTok data was being accessed in China, these prior statements seem to be misleading, at best.

The Trump administration had previously tried to ban TikTok by way of an executive order, but was held up in the courts. The Biden administration didn’t pursue the matter. But this latest incident now has the GOP interested in a ban once again. Fourteen GOP senators have also issued letters calling for answers from the video app, arguing it’s a national security threat.

Of course, it’s not that easy to ban TikTok. Last time around, TikTok creators successfully sued to stop the ban, which they said would prevent them from being able to earn a living. Another judge had also blocked Trump’s ban, saying the former president had overstepped his authority.

TikTok, meanwhile, has responded to BuzzFeed’s reporting by announcing it’s moving all U.S. user data to Oracle servers in the U.S., after which it will then delete U.S. users’ data from its own data centers, it says. Sure, Jan.

Platforms: Apple

  • Apple announced on Thursday developers in South Korea can now use third-party payments in their apps published to the South Korea App Store but will still pay a 26% commission. Plus, just as it tried before with Dutch dating apps, which had also won the right to use third-party payments, Apple said developers will need to submit their revised apps in a separate binary. Dutch regulators had pushed back against that provision, calling it an undue burden on developers, and Apple eventually dropped the requirement to come into compliance. It’s unclear how the Korea Communication Commission (KCC) will choose to respond, however.
  • Apple CarPlay in iOS 16 will support a new feature that allows drivers to pay for gas through a screen in their car using the fuel company’s app, instead of having to pay at the pump itself. BP, Shell and Chevron have expressed interest.
  • Apple clarified the iPad home hub support in iOS 16, after testers noted the iPad could no longer serve as a home hub — while Apple TV and HomePod devices could. The company explained that the Home app will introduce a new architecture in iPadOS 16 and iPad won’t be supported as a home hub with that upgrade. Impacted users can opt to not update their Home app to continue to use their iPad as a home hub.
  • Apple released the fourth public beta of iOS 15.6 and iPadOS 15.6.

Platforms: Google

  • Google’s Switch to Android app for iOS users is now compatible with all Android 12 phones, instead of just Pixel phones as before. The feature allows users to more easily make the move from iOS to Android by copying over contacts, calendars, photos and videos, and instructing on how to deregister iMessage.
  • Google settled a lawsuit with Android app developers over fees. The company settled a lawsuit with U.S. app developers who made less than $2 million in Play Store revenue from 2016-2021 by setting aside $90 million in a fund to pay back money to developers. The suit had argued Google gained a monopoly in the Android app distribution space through anti-competitive practices. The law firm said 48,000 U.S. developers are eligible to receive payments from Google.

E-commerce & Food Delivery

  • Food delivery biz Deliveroo will expand advertising on its app in July, including by adding ads to its order-tracking page as it chases profitability.
  • Fast food and membership club apps are seeing increased demand amid inflation, Apptopia reports.
  • TikTok is testing a dedicated “Shop” feed in Indonesia that lets users browse and purchase products from different categories, such as clothing and electronics. Of note, the feed sits on the app’s main page alongside its For You and Following feeds, which would be a major change to the product. The TikTok Shop service itself is currently available in select markets, including Indonesia, Vietnam, Singapore and the U.K.

Augmented Reality

  • Pokémon GO developer Niantic laid off 8% of its workforce, or around 85-90 people, amid the economic downturn. The company also canceled four upcoming projects, including Heavy Metal, a Transformers game that had already entered beta testing; Hamlet, a collaboration with the theater company behind “Sleep No More;” and two other projects known as Blue Sky and Snowball. Niantic has not been able to reproduce the success of its flagship game, having shut down a Harry Potter AR title and so far seen little adoption for its new AR game, Pikmin Bloom. The company is now working on a new AR game, NBA All-World.
  • Niantic’s Lightship is also powering a new “Game of Thrones” app designed to promote HBO’s upcoming prequel series “House of the Dragon.” The AR app will allow users to hatch a personalized dragon egg and raise their dragon at home. The app, produced by The Mill, will arrive on July 20.
  • Niantic launched Campfire, a new social app for its community that shows a map of your area with game experiences and activities from friends and other nearby players. The app helps users find local communities, add and manage friends, chat in one-on-one and group messages, join events and more.

Social

Facebook Groups new navigation and menu

Image Credits: Facebook

  • Facebook takes on Discord. The company this week rolled out new features for Facebook Groups including “Channels,” that allow users to connect with one another in smaller groups via chat or audio, similar to Discord, or in interest-based communities. The app will also test a new sidebar that will make it easier for users to find their groups more quickly, with the option to pin favorites to the top.
  • Facebook also rolled out NFTs. U.S. NFT creators will now be able to display NFTs under a new tab on their profiles. Meta recently launched NFTs on Instagram in May 2022.
  • Pinterest has a new CEO. The image pinboard and link-saving site’s co-founder and CEO Ben Silbermann stepped down after a 12-year run, turning over the reins to Google commerce boss Bill Ready. Previously, Ready ran Google’s shopping and payments arm after joining Google from PayPal, which acquired its startup Braintree for $800 million in 2013. Last fall, PayPal had been reported to be considering a Pinterst acquisition.
  • Instagram rolled out Reels APIs for developers. The new endpoints added to Instagram’s developer platform will allow developers to schedule Reels, publish to Instagram Business accounts, access social interaction metrics, reply to or delete comments, hide or unhide comments, disable or enable comments, find public Reels tagged with specific hashtags and identify Reels where an Instagram Business or Creator’s alias has been tagged or @mentioned.
  • Instagram users can now delete their accounts from within the iOS app. The app has complied with Apple’s new policy that states any app offering account creation must also now offer deletion. Instagram, however, puts accounts on hold for a month instead of immediately deleting them. If you log back in at any time, the deletion process is canceled.
  • Instagram is testing a change that turns all videos into Reels. The company said it’s trying to “simplify and improve” the video experience in the app. In reality, the move is yet another effort aimed at helping Instagram catch up with TikTok.
  • Short-form video app Triller filed for an IPO. The company confidentially filed for a U.S. IPO after ending its $5 billion merger with video ad software provider SeaChange International on June 14.

Messaging

  • WhatsApp is developing avatars. The Meta-owned company is working on an avatars feature similar to Apple’s Memoji or Snap’s Bitmoji, that could stand in for the user during video calls.

Streaming & Entertainment

  • Spotify launched a new personalized playlist option called “Supergrouper” that lets you create your own supergroup consisting of up to five artists. After you create and name your group, Spotify will curate a playlist of songs from the artists you selected, which you can also share on social media.
  • U.S. artists on Spotify can now use the app’s Marquee self-serve ad-buying option to promote releases across 14 markets via the Spotify for Artists dashboard. Marquee first launched in October 2019 but wasn’t able to target users outside the U.S. initially.
  • Twitch added a new Guest Star feature that lets streaming hosts bring up to five guests into a stream and swap them in and out.

Gaming

  • Meta VR developers call out the company for hypocrisy given its complaints over Apple’s App Store fees. The developers are frustrated with Meta’s 30% cut of their purchases and 15-30% cut of subscriptions, similar to Apple’s. They said Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg had called Apple’s fees “monopoly rents,” but his company is doing the same thing.
  • The WSJ examined the growing complexity of hypercasual games which have begun adding leaderboards, multiplayer formats and in-app purchases to these previously simple games as they look to retain player retention amid market saturation. The games often also use rewarded ads or those that showcase someone playing poorly to encourage users’ sense of competition. Other ads will feature gameplay that doesn’t exist at all.

Travel & Transportation

  • Car rental apps in the U.S. hit all-time highs for new installs and MAUs in May, Apptopia found, indicating pent-up travel demand and possibly a desire to avoid the chaotic airline issues. New installs are projected to increase 27% YoY in Q2 2022, and MAUs are expected to increase 19.4%. Enterprise (39.6%), Hertz (36.8%) and Turo (34.3%) are growing MAUs the fastest, the firm said.

Reading & News

  • Storytelling community Wattpad launched a creator program that offers writers up to $25,000 in compensation. There’s also a new metric called “Engaged Readers” that helps track readers’ interest in stories and a creator portal where writers can get other tips about improving their content.
  • Substack has begun to convert some writers’ text into audio automatically using text-to-speech technology. Readers using the Substack iOS app will have the ability to hear posts read aloud as a result.

Image Credits: Substack

Government & Policy

  • Russia is issuing fines to companies that aren’t storing Russian citizens’ personal data in the country. Google, Twitch, Pinterest, Airbnb and UPS have already been fined, and the government has opened cases against LikeMe and Apple as well.

Security & Privacy

  • Google notified Android users who were compromised by Hermit government-grade spyware which targeted victims in Kazakhstan and Italy. Google also examined the Hermit iOS app which is sideloaded onto devices and included six exploits, including two zero-days. Apple said it revoked all known accounts and certificates associated with the spyware campaign.
  • T-Mobile launched a service called App Insights that allows marketers to target wireless customers based on the apps they have installed. Customer data is anonymized and pooled together with others with similar interests and behaviors. And users are opted in by default.
  • Instagram is accused of continuing to allow a man accused of selling photos of children to pedophiles to maintain his account and share images for two months following his arrest, Forbes reports.
  • Google updated its password manager for Chrome and Android, offering a way for users to manually enter new passwords across platforms, as well as a new unified user experience that automatically groups multiple passwords for the same sites or apps together, and a new shortcut on the Android home screen to get access to these passwords. The iOS Chrome app will also be able to generate strong passwords for you.

💰 Data analysis startup Zing Data raised $2.4 million in seed funding led by Kindred Ventures for a mobile app that lets business users work with data wherever they are in an accessible way. The product can connect with a variety of popular data sources, including Snowflake, Trino, Google BigQuery and Google Sheets, as well as databases like Postgres and MySQL. Users then choose a dataset and some fields to display, then can manipulate the data to see different views and can share charts with others.

💰 London-based Birdie, a provider of digital tools for in-home care, raised $30 million in Series B funding led by Sofina, which will be used to scale the business in Europe. The SaaS company works with 700 care businesses that deliver millions of visits per month to around 35,000 recipients and 8,000 family members. Its services are available through both an iOS and Android app.

💰 London-based fintech Cleo, an AI-powered app for financial assistance, raised $80 million in Series C funding led by Sofina. The app targets the U.S. market’s Gen Z users with budgets and savings guidance and education.

💰 New Delhi-based digital bank Progcap raised $40 million in a Series C extension, valuing the business at $600 million, up 3x since September 2021. Creation Investments and Tiger Global led the round. The app serves 700,000 small retailers across hundreds of Indian cities and towns.

 

Continue Reading

Mobile

Google consolidates its Chrome and Android password managers – TechCrunch

Published

on

Google today announced an update to its password manager that will finally introduce a consistent look-and-feel across the service’s Chrome and Android implementations. Users will soon see a new unified user experience that will automatically group multiple passwords for the same sites or apps together, as well as a new shortcut on the Android home screen to get access to these passwords.

In addition to this, Google is also now adding a new password-related feature to Chrome on iOS, which can now generate strong passwords for you (once you set Chrome as an autofill provider).

Image Credits: Google

Meanwhile, on Android, Google’s password check can now also flag weak and re-used passwords and help you to automatically change them, while Chrome users across platforms will now see compromised password warnings.

With this release today, Google will now also finally let you manually add passwords to its passwords manager (“due to popular demand,” Google says) and the company is bringing Touch-to-Login to Chrome on Android to log you in to supported sites with a single tap.

Image Credits: Google

Continue Reading

Mobile

TaskHuman lands $20M to expand its virtual coaching platform – TechCrunch

Published

on

TaskHuman, a professional development platform focused on coaching, today announced that it raised $20 million in Series B funding led by Madrona with participation from Impact Venture Capital, RingCentral Ventures, Sure Ventures, USVP, Gaingels, PeopleTech Angels, Propel(x) and Zoom Ventures. The latest infusion brings the company’s total raised to $35 million, which CEO Ravi Swaminathan said is being put toward product development, marketing and sales efforts.

Swaminathan and Daniel Mazzella co-founded TaskHuman in 2017, with the goal of connecting users with specialists on topics related to their personal and professional lives. Swaminathan was previously a program and logistics manager at Dell and VP of software solutions at SanDisk, while Mazzella was a system admin at Stamps.com. The two met at Wizr, a startup developing AI systems to analyze security camera footage.

“When it comes to learning and personal development, no amount of generic articles or watching pre-recorded videos [can replace] a real person with experience in a given area. Creating TaskHuman was our response to solve this challenge,” Swaminathan told TechCrunch in an email Q&A. “We started by offering foundational needs, including health and wellness, physical fitness, mental, spiritual, emotional wellbeing, and more. Since then, we’ve continued to expand and support the entire needs of an individual for personal and professional growth, like financial wellbeing, sales and leadership coaching, pet training, travel planning, and more.”

TaskHuman users connect with experts over live video chats. The company claims to have a network of over 1,000 “coaches” across nearly 50 countries, each specializing in distinctive areas. An AI-powered search feature lets users search for topics and coaches in natural language (e.g., “I want to lose weight”), while a recommendation engine attempts to personalize the browsing experience by suggesting, for example, similar coaches based on past sessions.

“TaskHuman has a direct relationship with each coach, and we pay them according to the terms of our relationship for their coaching contributions. They are all contractors globally,” Swaminathan said, when asked about the coaching payment structure.

Users can buy access to the TaskHuman network with “TaskHuman minutes,” which can be applied to a chat session with any specialist or topic, Swaminathan says. Alternatively, companies can subscribe to TaskHuman to offer unlimited access to their employees as well as in-app content and group sessions.

Image Credits: TaskHuman

Swaminathan makes the case that the enterprise in particular stands to benefit from TaskHuman’s platform. It’s true that corporate training programs tend to be a mixed bag, with only 25% of respondents to a McKinsey survey saying that their company’s training improved their job performance. According to another survey, 75% of managers were dissatisfied with their company’s learning and development function in 2019.

“At the board and C-suite level, many companies view insufficient attention to employee well-being as a threat to productivity and, conversely, a strong commitment to each worker’s physical, mental, and spiritual prosperity as a competitive advantage for recruiting and retaining talent in a time of labor shortages and the ‘Great Resignation,’” Swaminathan said. “From case studies, we have found return on investment in four main areas: preventing burnout, reducing employee attrition, improving employee engagement and recruitment, and reducing medical cost claims.”

Competition in the crowded e-learning field spans BetterUp, CoachHub and Torch. Swaminathan argues that his company’s offering is broader in scope, however, and offers superior access to specialists because it doesn’t require scheduling sessions in advance.

“We have found that the pandemic really allowed people to go beyond their comfort zones and embrace video technologies like TaskHuman, Zoom, RingCentral, and others,” Swaminathan said. “We feel a need to accelerate our mission during these difficult times to help people in both their personal and professional lives, and we feel an urgency to combat the current mental health crisis and Great Resignation culture by fulfilling the dire craving for 1:1, personalized engagement for personal and professional growth.”

Certainly, TaskHuman has benefited from the pandemic, which spurred coaches of all types to move online. According to a 2021 survey by the International Coaching Federation, 83% of coaches increased their use of audio-video platforms for coaching during the health crisis while 82% saw a decrease for in-person sessions.

TaskHuman says that its customers include Zoom, Dr. Scholl’s, RingCentral and public and government institutions like Purdue University, Oakland Housing Authority and Job Corps centers run by the U.S. Department of Labor. While Swaminathan declined to disclose financials, he said that annual recurring revenue has grown by more than 5 times year over year.

“Our company is laser-focused on global expansion and scaling its network of coaches,” Swaminathan said. “We will be continually adding to the set of human experience and expertise that are available on the platform and expanding support for providers in even more languages and countries around the world.”

Continue Reading

Trending